Kitchen Bitch

Cooking in the Kitchen with Sass & Class

Easy DIY Chive Blossom Vinegar May 14, 2012


As my career progresses, I’m really beginning to understand the power of vinegar in cooking. It adds much needed acid to stews, sauces, soups and dressings, and it comes in wild variety of flavor profiles. For the most part I always stuck with white distilled vinegar, red wine vinegar, and apple cider vinegar, but I’m realizing there’s a whole world of vinegar flavors out there—many of which I can make at home!

I’ve always been a huge fan Marisa McClellen’s blog Food in Jars, and she recently re-posted one of her old recipes for Chive Blossom Vinegar. I immediately thought of my mom’s herb garden and the three giant chive plants that protect its borders. I forwarded the post to my mom, and low and behold she had a ton of chive blossoms for me to make this vinegar. Thanks Ma!

Like Marisa explains, this isn’t really much of a recipe as it is instructions, and the little photo collage above pretty much explains it all. You can use the resulting vinegar in place of the vinegar called for in any recipe you come across, but I suggest using it in salad dressings and other raw cooking preparations. I would put it in my vinaigrette for my everyday spinach salad and in the vinaigrette for my potato and pasta salads (instead of a mayo dressing, use a vinaigrette, light and tasty!). It will  add a nice mild onion-like tang to any dish you add it to! Here’s the step-by-step directions:

DIY Chive Blossom Vinegar

1. Gather chives with blossoms. Put them in water until ready to use.

2. Remove blossoms from chive stem. Soak in cold water for several minutes to remove any debris or critters.

3. Move the blossoms to a salad spinner or pat dry.

4. Pack the blossoms about 1/2 to 2/3 of the way up whatever size clean canning jar you’d like to use.

5. Pour in vinegar to cover the blossoms, seal with the lid, and move to a cool, dark place for 2 weeks.

6. After two weeks, strain the vinegar, and move to a clean container. Store in a cool dark place.

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6 Responses to “Easy DIY Chive Blossom Vinegar”

  1. Lauren Says:

    Hi KB!
    I love when you post different recipe ideas like this! Can you give me a better idea of what it would taste like (I’m assuming chives…but not sure if it makes a difference because you use just the blossoms?) also, would this work if you used chopped up chives instead? What would you recommend using this on (or in)? I would love some coordinating recipe ideas as well!
    Thanks for thinking outside the box!
    -Lauren

    • Hi Lauren,
      Yes, this vinegar will taste likes chives after the full two weeks (I’m still waiting on mine to fully mature, but I can’t wait!). I’m not sure if this will work with chopped up chives——I haven’t seen it done yet, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done! You can use the vinegar in place of the vinegar called for in any recipe you come across, but I suggest using it in salad dressings. I would put it in my vinaigrette for my everyday spinach salad and in the vinaigrette for my potato and pasta salads. It will just add a nice mild onion-like tang to any dish you add it to! Happy cooking, and let me know if you come up with anything fun to use it in. Best of luck, The KB

  2. sybaritica Says:

    I love the aroma of chive blossoms … I bet that tastes great! How long do the blossoms stay looking fresh and pretty, or do you strain them out after a while?

    • Hi! Yes, you do strain the blossoms out before serving, about 2 weeks after the vinegar has had some time to deepen in flavor. In fact, I’m about to strain mine today. It has a beautiful purple color!

  3. Nina Says:

    Hi What kind of vinegar should be used here? White wine? I have seen that in many different recipes but this recipe seems the most simple which is what I am after! 🙂


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